Tag Archive | mouth

Marty The Zebra

DSCN3937It was his cute cartoonish style that made me pick this zebra pattern as my next amigurumi project. I liked his big head and his fat stubby hind legs that lets him sit. What I didn’t like was that the pattern only called for the zebra stripes on his body, not on his head or legs but that was ok. I could fix that!

DSCN3940Anxious to get crocheting, I grabbed the black and white Red Heart Love yarn I had purchased at Walmart’s Black Friday sale last year and I got started! I noticed right away that the Love yarn was much softer and the fibers liked to separate more while crocheting than the Red Heart Super Saver yarn, so I had to be careful where I inserted my hook and I needed to watch my tensions more closely as I crocheted.

I crocheted the body first. The body was not crocheted in continuous rounds. A slip stitch and chain were done at the end and start of each round to help keep the stripes even. Each stripe consisted of two rounds, so rather than than cutting and tying the yarn every other round, I carried the yarn. The tension of the carried yarn was not a problem because it was being carried over a very small space. It was cumbersome to have two skeins of yarn, twisting, as I crocheted though.

DSCN3936I crocheted the front and hind legs next. As mentioned, the pattern called for no stripes on these pieces. I wanted stripes so I started with solid black for the hooves and then made stripes, two rounds thick and then I alternated the colors. I crocheted in continuous rounds rather than slip stitching and chaining since it was only a couple of stripes and the color changes would be hidden under the legs. I also carried the yarn as I did with the body.

DSCN3942The head was the next piece to be crocheted and once again the pattern called for it to be unstriped, but I was going to stripe it. I crocheted the mouth in black then started the stripes. I crocheted the stripes exactly like the legs, in continuous rounds, two rounds thick, carrying the yarn as I crocheted. Like the legs, I could hide the color changes of the stripes on the bottom of the head.

The tail was the only piece that I did not stripe. I crocheted it white and then attached a few black pieces of yarn to the end.

DSCN3917The challenge for this amigurumi came when I stitched the head and body together. When I attached the head to the body, the zebra was staring at the ceiling, so I needed to move the head down. After a lot of pinning, stitching and unstitching, I got the head attached to the body without the zebra looking up. The legs and tail were much easier to stitch on.

DSCN3926The mane for this zebra was fun to attach. I did not quite follow the patterns instructions of making the mane. I knew how I wanted it to look, so I started by cutting 5 inch pieces of black and white yarn. Starting at the center of the head, I attached 2 rows of 3 white yarns. I then attached 2 rows of 3 black yarns and alternated this pattern down the back of the head. When I was done, the husband helped me trim the mane by hand and it was done. I was concerned about making the mane from the Love yarn because of how much it likes to separate. It will not take much play before the mane’s yarns will be untwisted and fuzzing, but that might be a fun look for the mane.

DSCN3921I picked some fun cartoon eyes for this zebra that I attached while crocheting the head. I wanted this zebra to have a big smile but I was having trouble getting the curves that I wanted for the smile while stitching on the mouth. To get the smile I wanted, I decided to glue on the mouth instead. I placed the yarn where I wanted it to be, then rolled the yarn down, applied a line of glue and then rolled the yarn back into place on top of the glue. This worked well and gave me the smile I wanted.

After some brainstorming with the husband, we picked the name Marty for this zebra. Marty is very cute. He makes me smile when I look at him. I like his extra stripes. Soon, Marty will have a new home and I hope he will be loved and played with often.

Until then, crochet forth and stripe on!

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Have Yourself Some Merry Little Christmas Crafting.

T’was the night before Christmas and all through the house, not a creature was stirring…

EXCEPT for the crazy crocheter with visions of grandeur still frantically crocheting her Christmas mouse!

2015 Christmas Card Picture

 

I told myself NO CHRISTMAS PROJECTS this year, despite all the wonderful ideas and patterns there are to read about in the blogosphere and on Ravelry for Christmas crafters.

But, right around Thanksgiving the Christmas crafting bug bit me and I decided that just one little, teeny, tiny, project that could be easily completed before Christmas came and went would be ok to make.

This project needed to be something small and simple that could be made with minimal stress and time. As I looked at my patterns and some ideas on line, I found this pattern for some amigurumi Christmas light bulbs and picked it to be my one and only Christmas crafting project for this year.

The pattern for these Christmas light bulbs is very simple and it only took a couple of Christmas movies for me to have 10 bulbs, 2 of each color, crocheted up. It took a few more Christmas movies to stuff the 10 bulbs, and then I had to stop watching movies altogether so that I could concentrate on the details of these Christmas bulbs. The devil is always in the details isn’t it?

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It took just a few minutes to stitch the tops of the Christmas bulbs closed once they were stuffed. I decided to use googly eyes instead of safety eyes, so, with the husbands help, it only took a few more minutes to glue the eyes on to each bulb. But now the long process of giving each bulb a smile and a personality started.

I tried big smiles, small smiles, v-shaped smiles, rounded smiles, and crazy zig-zag smiles but nothing looked good to me. I finally decided on smaller v-shaped smiles. I was using black yarn to make the smiles but the black yarn was not showing up well on the darker color bulbs so I tried white yarn instead. That looked awful, so I switched to some silver color yarn. After much trial and error, I completed the 10 smiles on the Christmas bulbs.

Now, what should I do with 10 Christmas crocheted amigurumi light bulbs? I could chain them together into a string of lights to make one Christmas decoration. Or I could put a bulb on a long piece of string or yarn and make it a necklace for all my friends and coworkers, but who wants a silly Christmas light bulb necklace? At last, I decided to make them up as Christmas tree ornaments.

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I dug through the closet and found some silver and gold metallic cording to make loops to hang these Christmas light bulb ornaments. I carefully cut even lengths of the cording, and threaded the cording through the top of each bulb. I knotted the cording, planning to twist the cording around and then hide the knot in the top of the bulb but this did not work.

The knots in the cording were too big to pull into the stuffing at the top of the bulbs. In hind sight, if I had stuffed the tops of the bulbs less, this would have worked, but I stuffed the tops good and plenty so hiding the knots in the top was not an option. I tried using yarn instead of the cording but that did not look as good. The silver and gold cording added an elegant Christmas touch to the bulbs. So, after much debate, I decided to just leave the knot at the top of the cording so it was still visible.

This was a great idea and a simple solution except that the bare ends of the cording knots frayed like crazy. I wanted the ends of the knots trimmed close but then the cording would fray and the knot would come untied. Flustered, I turned to the husband who said one word.

GLUE!

So thank heavens for clear drying glue. So, after carefully knotting and trimming the cording ends, I doused the knots and ends in glue to seal the cording, stop the fraying and keep the knot tied. After much patience with the knotting, cutting and glueing, the glue dried clear and the Christmas light bulb ornaments were done.

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At first, I did not like what I had made and I thought seriously about tossing the bulbs into the garbage can. But after they sat on the cutting table for a little while, their silliness grew on me and I now think that they are very cute silly little Christmas light bulb ornaments that my friends and family will be more than willing to hang them on their Christmas trees this year.

Until next time, Crochet forth and Christmas craft on!

Hey Chubby! Stop Eating All My Stuffing! – Part 2 of 2

DSCN0091As I passed the neck and was heading on down the body, the rounds of crocheting just kept increasing in stitch count until I had to add an extra stitch marker to help me keep track of the count. And the body of the moose just kept getting bigger and bigger. I was afraid at one point that I would run out of yarn. And since the head and body of the moose needed to be stuffed as I crocheted, I was really starting to notice just how big this body was getting as I went along.

I had started with half of a bag of stuffing and I thought that would certainly be enough to complete this amigurumi but I was wrong. I used that half bag and then had started well into another before I got this chubby moose body all stuffed and finished.

DSCN0083As I was stitching the pieces of this amigurumi together, I realized why the legs were so stubby. Something had to hold up this chubby body so it didn’t fall over when sitting. The antlers were time consuming to stitch all of the smaller pieces together, but they went together easily and looked great once done. The placement of the ears and antlers on the head was a little tricky but they worked out fine. And the arms stitched on just great.

Now was the moment of truth…

Was one round at the neck the correct decision early on in the construction of this moose or should it have been three?

I still don’t know the answer!

DSCN0074The snout and mouth were a tight fit and the extra two rounds might have helped in stitching them on, but the snout and mouth were supposed to be a tight fit according to the picture. So that means that one round might still be correct. I guess the only way to know if it should be one or three rounds is to make another moose with three rounds at the neck and see how it looks compared to this first one.

I really do like the look of the snout and mouth as two separate pieces though. I think it gives this moose it’s character.

DSCN0087This moose received his name Kevin very early on in the crocheting process. I don’t know why he is named Kevin, he just looked like a Kevin to me, so that name stuck. Kevin the Chubby Moose.

And even though he consumed way too much of my stuffing stash, he turned out to be very cute once completed. I will have to make a trip to the store for more stuffing before I can make another one though.

Until next time, crochet forth and moose on.

Hey Chubby! Stop Eating All My Stuffing! – Part 1 of 2

DSCN0089I’ve been to Yellowstone National Park, and I’ve seen a real moose from six inches away. Yes, they are big animals. Yes, they not to be messed with. Yes, they go and do whatever they please. Yet as I reached 80 stitches per round on my latest amigurumi’s body, I thought to myself, “this is a little too much moose”.

Because this is a story about Kevin.

Kevin the Chubby Moose.

When I read through the pattern for this amigurumi, I knew it was going to be big, but I did not realize just how chubby this moose would be when I first started it. As always, I started the crocheting with the arms, legs and other parts. After I crocheted the arms, they looked good. So I crocheted the legs next and they looked stubby. Then I crocheted the antlers and ears and they were fun to make. Finally, I crocheted the snout and the mouth. These are two separate pieces. I was not going to have to give this moose a smile since he was going to have a mouth. It was then time to start the body and head.

P1040413In this pattern the head and body are all stitched as one piece, not two separate pieces stitched together. This combo started at the top of head and all was going well until I reached the rounds just before the neck. The pattern called for three rounds of equal stitches but the round count on the pattern only showed one round of stitches.

So, do I crochet one round or three rounds?

DSCN0082I crocheted just one round and it looked too short, so I crocheted two more rounds and that looked too long. I undid the extra two rounds and held the snout and mouth to head. One round looked right with the snout and mouth so I decided to go with one round. Now, this would not have been a big deal if the head and body had been two separate pieces. If I decided later when stuffing that I wanted the extra rounds at the neck and the pieces would have been crocheted in two pieces, it would just be a matter of adding in the extra rounds. But because they are all done as one piece, if I decided I that I had wanted the extra rounds when I was stuffing, I would be out of luck. I would have to undo everything that I had crocheted of the body portion to add in the extra rounds. And I was not willing to do that. So once I decided that just the one round was right, there would be no changing it to three rounds later. So I hope that I chose correctly.

Find out next week if I was right!

Until next time, crochet forth and moose on.

Mousey Decisions

DSCN0060Have you ever seen a crochet pattern and said “Oh, I can’t wait to make that”? I know you have and I so have I. Usually I say that and then promptly push the pattern out of site and out of mind and continue on with my current project, and just hope that I will somehow just remember that pattern when its time to start on a new project. Most times though, I don’t remember that awesome, have to do next, pattern and I end up working on something else instead. This time though I did not. I had fallen in love with this little mouse pattern and I wanted to make it next, and so I made a point to remember it and I did it right after my previous project was done.

DSCN0062Although this pattern looked really simple, there were some design decisions that had to be made while crocheting the pieces of this mouse. The first decision was the length of the legs. The pattern called for short stubby legs to be crocheted to the feet which would be best if the mouse would always be in a sitting position like a shelf sitter. But I decided that I wanted the option for my mouse to be either sitting or standing, so I added two extra rounds to his legs to accomplish that. The next decision came with the crocheting of his arms. The pattern called for no stuffing in the arms. As I crocheted the arms I decided I wanted a little stuffing at the ends of the arms to give them some form and shape. I had to add the stuffing as I crocheted to get the stuffing where I wanted it. Decision number three came with the crocheting of the tail. The tail is 21 crocheted rounds of 4 stitches. This was a tight and difficult crochet and took me a long time to make. As I worked on the rounds I debated whither the tail needed stuffed or if a pipe cleaner should be inserted into it to help it keep its form. The pattern did not call for anything though, so I decided to leave the tail as just the crochet stitches. Since the tail seems to hold its curl just fine on it’s own, that was probably the correct decision.

DSCN0072With the pieces of this mouse all crocheted, I had to rethink one of my previous decisions. As I stitched the longer legs on the mouse I decided that I did not like the longer length. The longer length was fine when the mouse was standing, but when sitting, the legs were too long and looked funny. I thought about attaching the legs to the bottom of the body instead of the front of the body to solve this longer look problem while the mouse was sitting but then the mouse would not be able to sit. So, I finally undid my two extra rounds and made the legs the length the pattern called for. And I DSCN0067stitched the legs to the front of the body as the pattern called for. In a sitting position, the mouse looks great. In a standing position, he looks ok with the shorter legs. He looks better in a standing position with shorter legs than he did in a sitting position with longer legs, so the short legs attached to the front of body, as the pattern called for, was the best result. Luckily, I do still like the stuffing in the arms and the tail is fine without it.

The final decision on this mouse was his smile. The pattern did not call for a mouth or smile but I wanted one. This guy was just too cute not to be happy, so I gave him a simple smile. I like his smile. It makes me happy when I see it.

DSCN0066Making design decisions is not always my favorite thing to do, even though you have to make design decisions all the time while crafting and sewing. Even with all this decision that had to be made, this little mouse was a fun project and I think he turned out just as adorable as the pictures were in his pattern. I have not named him anything more than little mouse yet though. I hope that someday he will find a good home and that someone will give him a proper name.

Until next time, crochet forth and crochet on.