Tag Archive | shrink

I’ll Never Fall In Love Again!

Screen-Shot-2013-11-05-at-9.01.40-AMYou can see it from across the fabric store and there is a whole wall displaying it…

You’re drawn to it and it is so soft, fuzzy and warm, and some of the cutest designs ever are printed on it…

You MUST buy some and, as a general rule, its on sale…

Of course, I am talking about polar fleece and everybody just loves this fabric! Everyone it seems except me. Dare I say it out loud, I may not be in love with fleece or enjoy working with it as much as everyone else on the planet seems to be.

And here is why.

I, like everyone else, love the idea or the concept of fleece fabric. And who wouldn’t? It’s soft, warm, fuzzy fabric with no fraying, no shrinking, it looks good on both sides, it has some stretch but not too much stretch, and all the other fun features that fleece offers a sewer. What isn’t there to love? But, after sewing the last girl’s fleece jacket and starting my next sewing project with fleece, I’m not convinced that it really is all that easy and wonderful of a fabric to work with.

When I first started purchasing fleece fabrics, I planned to only make blankets with it, and who cared if the blankets were a little off grain and the print wasn’t perpendicular, or that it can’t be easily ironed or caused several headaches when sewn with the serger due to the amount of bulk.

DSCN2567For the blankets I was making, I did not give these concepts a second thought, so I was in love with fleece just like everyone else, and I bought any and all I could get to hide in the stash for future projects I had dreamt up. When I decided that I wanted to expand my skill set a little bit and make more than blankets from the fleece, I was at a point in my sewing skills where I did not worry about grain line, or matching designs, or ironing seams. So for the first couple of fleece projects that I made, I just cut it out and sewed it up, and I was still in love with fleece.

DSCN2575 (1)As my sewing skills have advanced over time, I am now far more concerned with thing like grain lines, matching the designs, and ironing the seams. So, when it was time to make the latest girl’s fleece jacket, these things were foremost on my mind. As I cut out the pattern and the froggy’s and rainbows weren’t straight, making it difficult to cut on the grain line and match the designs up, working with fleece became more than just cut and sew.

DSCN2572Looking at the piece of fleece, there were spots where I had to move over 21 inches from the edge of the fabric before I could find a good spot to cut. This was crazy! I decided that the froggy piece of fleece was just flawed until I started my next fleece project. Although not as much, I had to move 9 inches from the edge to get the footballs and helmets to line up.

Does all fleece suffer from this problem?

DSCN2563If it does, I’m going to have to watch WAY more closely when I buy fleece for pieces that I only have to move over 9 inches rather than 21 inches, or hopefully I can find some fleece that I will only lose a couple of inches on the edge. Plus, I’m going to have to buy extra fleece to accommodate for the lost fabric. I wanted to make my latest project a size large but had to switch to a size medium when I lost the 9 inches along the edge.

DSCN2566I turned to the Internet to see if I was alone in my wavering love of fleece, and from what I was reading, I was alone, everyone else seems to love fleece, but I did find several article titled, “How to sew fleece.” So, maybe you just have to learn the skill of sewing with fleece, just like learning to sew knits, furs, silks, actually any and all other types of fabrics. Maybe after learning some lessons about sewing with fleece, I will then be completely in love with fleece like so many others are.

Well I ldid learn a lot from the articles that I read on how to sew fleece, and I am excited to try out some of the things that I learned.

Luckily, I have my next sewing project involving fleece all cut out and ready to sew, so stay tuned to see how it turned out!

Until next time, sew forth and hopefully fall in love again.

We Interrupt This Sewing Plan….

DSCN1278I needed to do some basic sewing. With summertime on the way, I needed some new work shirts to wear. So, I set my next project aside to make me some simple basic t-shirt style shirts to wear to work. But as with all sewing, there are always lessons and patience to be learned. Let me tell you the story.

I started by picking out some knit fabric from the stash. The first piece I picked out was a purple single knit with white sea shell designs that I had picked up from a thrift store many years ago. The piece was not quite big enough for the shirt I was making but I figured I could make it work. I tend to make my shirts long, so if I made this shirt just an inch shorter than I normally did, I would have just enough fabric. So I cut out the shirt and started to sew it up. The sewing went fine until it was time to hem it.

DSCN1280Some how I had cut the front of the shirt very crookedly. I laid the shirt on the cutting table and evened out the front but in doing so I cut off even more of the front length of the shirt.

This minus the inch to fit the fabric now left me with a very short front.

I went to cut off the back of the shirt to match the front, but hated to lose the length so I decided to leave the back longer than the front. Because of the slit in the side of my shirts, there would be no problem to hem the back of the shirt slightly longer than the front. After hemming the shirt, I liked the uneven hem. After wearing the shirt, I REALLY like the uneven hem. When wearing the shirt, I can really tell that the front is shorter than I like but since the back is longer, I am willing to wear the shirt.

DSCN1284The next fabric was white interlock knit with a black and red scattered design that I had also purchased at a thrift store many years ago. This time though there was plenty of fabric so I cut out generous hems for this shirt. The shirt sewed up fine and I liked the fit. The double needling of the hem gave me some hassle though. The fabric wanted to bunch under the needles, so I had to sew it VERY slowly, but it all worked out in the end. After wearing the shirt, I could have made the shirt a little shorter and the hems a little smaller. But the shirt is still comfortable to me, so I’m not going to mess with a good thing and modify the shirt.

DSCN1288The third shirt was made from a very stretchy knit I purchased on the internet. I love the fabric. It is soft and has a nice feel, but it was a challenge to sew. I carefully cut out the shirt, trying to not stretch the fabric as I cut it. I even put the walking foot on my machine to help keep the fabric from stretching as I sewed it up.

I sewed this shirt very slowly, trying not to pull the fabric but the fabric was so stretchy that it did not matter how careful I was. The first seams, the shoulder seams, finished long and distorted. Previously in my sewing career, I would have continued to sew as carefully as possible and hoped for the best in fit when the shirt was completed. Now that I have been sewing for awhile and am more experienced, I knew that if I wanted a wearable shirt, I had to solve the stretchy seam problem so I turned to ribbon.

DSCN0384I pulled a roll of 1/4 inch white ribbon from the closet, and cut pieces to fit my shoulder seams. After unpicking the previously sewn shoulder seams, I placed the ribbon on the shoulder seams and sewed down the center of the ribbon. With the ribbon, using the walking foot and sewing very slowly and carefully, I was able to sew nice, non-stretched shoulder seams. I then used the ribbon in the sleeve seams and it worked great as well. I did not use the ribbon on the side seams because the stretch of the fabric was not as much DSCN0421on those seams.

For the hem, I sewed the ribbon to the bottom of the fabric first then turned up the hem and completed it with the double needle. It would have been easier to have sewn on the ribbon as I double needled the hem but sewing it first meant I did not have to worry about catching the ribbon with the double needle and I could control the stretch better.

DSCN1289I tried to us the ribbon on the facings at the neck, but it did not work out. I could not keep the neckline from stretching and distorting as I sewed the facings on. It finally dawned on me to cut the facings from a woven non-stretch fabric instead of from the stretchy fabric of the shirt to solve the problem. This worked great and I was able to sew a nice looking neckline. I have worn the stretchy shirt and it is vey comfortable although it is odd sometimes when I expect it to stretch at a seam and it does not because of the ribbon in the seam.

With three new shirts added to my working wardrobe, I am ready to get back to my previous sewing plans and start my next project.

Until then, sew forth and summer on!

PJ’s, jamas, jammies, jams, puh-jah-muhz

IMG_0001I wanted to make my Simplicity 2771 pattern, the pajamas with piping, one more time so that I didn’t forget all I had learned about sewing piping, but I wanted to change it up a little this time around. I wanted the second version to be made with short sleeves and shorts for the summer. I had just thought about cutting the sleeves and legs of the pants off on the pattern 2771 to accomplish this, that is until I saw my Simplicity 3987 pattern hiding in the closet. I decided I could just add piping to the edges of the shirt from the 3987 pattern thus practicing adding piping and I would be trying out a new pattern as well. I purchased Simplicity 3987 on the same sale as Simplicity 2771 but I had not made something from it yet. So, this was a good plan.

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This project started with laundering the flannel, because I know how flannel LOVES to shrink, then I traced and cut out view B in a size 3 from the flannel. The flannel I used was just small scrap pieces so it was nice to use them up. It was at this point that I realized that piping was not going to work on this particular shirt top. Half of the piping would be hid under the buttons. Crap, why didn’t I think of that in the first place? Oh well. I was already too far in the process to abandon this project so I just continued on with it. At least I would still be trying out a new pattern that I hand’t made before and wanted to try out.

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P1030274I started sewing by following the pattern guide and sewed the pocket on the front of the shirt, but that is as far as I followed the guide. The pattern guide called for the side seams and the sleeve seams to be sewn next and then the sleeve inserted into the shirt. I decided to sew the sleeve to the shirt and then sew the side seam and the sleeve seam as one seam instead. I don’t know which way is the proper way to sew the sleeve to the shirt, but I don’t see that it really made a difference in the wearing of the shirt once it was done. The pattern guide also called for easing stitches in the sleeve cap. I decided to use my 10 fingers and about 50 pins (well, maybe a few less) to ease the sleeve onto the shirt. Although I was able to get the sleeve eased on to the shirt without any puckers or tucks, it might have been easier to use the easing stitches instead. Most shirts I have sewn have a dropped sleeve, so the sleeve cap is not as tall, but not with this shirt. The sleeve looks to sit right at the end of the shoulder. This was actual good practice for me to insert a sleeve fitted at the shoulder and may be why the guide wanted you to sew the side and sleeve seams first and use the easing stitches to set the sleeve in. I will give it a try the way it recommends the next time I make this pattern.

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P1030283The next learning experience with these pajamas came with the button holes. The pattern guide called for the button holes to be horizontal. I usually sew buttonholes vertically. On a shirt for me, vertical button holes keep me from having that gaping hole at the bust line that happens with horizontal button holes when you stretch in the shirt. I figured for a 3 year old’s pajamas it really would not make a difference and went ahead and followed the pattern guide. I shouldn’t have. I started at the bottom of the shirt and I didn’t think that where I started would make a difference, but it did. The bottom two buttonholes came out great. Then the trouble started. Because of the P1030286pocket, my automatic buttonholer had all kinds of issues. Because the surface was not even, it would not work over the thickness of the top of the pocket, so I turned the shirt around and did a lot of measuring but even with that the buttonholer hit the pocket at the top of the buttonhole and left me with misplaced half sewn buttonholes. If I had been making a girl’s shirt or made the buttonholes vertical or sewed the pocket on after making the buttonholes, none of this would have been an issue, instead I got uneven and poorly stitched buttonholes. I am not happy with the buttonholes on this project, but they are good enough and I doubt that the buttonholes with keep a little boy from wearing these pajama.

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P1030287The shorts bottoms were super simple. They don’t even have a side seam. One thing I did not like on this pattern was the fact that neither the shorts hem or the sleeve hem had the small extended edge to help with the turning of the hem. Both of them are just cut straight. Due to this, a small hem was all I was willing to do on both the shorts and sleeves. Now, for me that’s not a bad thing. I like smaller hems on the items I sew. The problem that arises is that because I am sewing empirically, I may need to shorten or lengthen the shorts and the sleeves and not having a healthy hem width decreases how much I can alter them. I added a small piece of flannel to the back seam to indicate the back from the front of the shorts since they are so basic in design.

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So, my final say on this pattern, Simplicity 3987, view B, is that although the final pajamas turned out fine and are very cute, this will not be my go to pajamas pattern for kids. My reason for this is the difficulty in putting the sleeves in and the missing hem edges. Because of these problems, I will go back to my Kwik-Sew book if I need to make more pajamas for kids. I will not part with the pattern just yet because of the night gown pattern in it and if I decided  I do want to try the set in sleeves again, I can. I may someday want to make this pattern again. We will see.

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But It’s Too Hot

Because we had such a cold winter this past year, the husband has wore his heavy fleece robot bathrobe all winter long, and has been nice and toasty in it. As the seasons are starting to change and the weather is starting to warm back up, I am starting to hear murmuring about how hot and heavy the robot bathrobe is. When I found the husband looking for his old worn out bathrobe for the coming summer months, I knew it was time to make him another lighter and cooler bathrobe for the summer months.

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IMGI got out the pattern that I had used when I constructed the robot bathrobe, but with our recent change in body size, I decided to try a newly purchased pattern, Simplicity 5314 instead. I purchased this pattern awhile back on one of Jo-Ann’s 5 for $5 pattern sales. I started by taking some quick measurements of the husband, but decided that since he would want a roomy big bathrobe, I would just make the XXXL size. Next came what fabric to use? I showed the husband the terry cloth I had picked up at Walmart for $1 per yard, but he cringed at the sight of the baby blue color of it. So, the next time we were at Joann’s, he spotted some nice flannel with monsters on it and I picked that for his next bathrobe. At the cutting table, I told the lady helping us that I needed 5 yards. There was 8 yards left on the bolt. Since I refuse to pay Jo-Ann’s regular prices for fabric and I would be use my coupon, I told the lady to give me the whole bolt, and I am glad I did. After putting the fabric through the washer and dryer, it shrank several inches. It was now only 40 inches wide, not 45. and at least 1/2 yard shorter. Wow. I was sure glad I had gotten the extra fabric.

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P1020777 - Version 2Too scared to cut into the expensive monster flannel, I decided I could use a new bathrobe too. This would give me the chance to muslin the pattern before cutting into the husband’s fabric. So, I dug out the baby blue terry cloth from the stash. I decided since I would be making the XXXL size for the husband, I would make the XXL size for me. I traced both sizes of the pattern and cut my size out of the terry cloth and proceeded to start sewing. Sewing with the stretch of terry cloth is alway interesting but things were going along just fine until it was time to try the bathrobe on. When I pulled the bathrobe on, it was HUGE. The shoulder seams went to my elbows, and the bottom of the armscye was at my waist, and it was longer than I am tall. It was way, way too big! And I decided that it was going to take major reconstruction to fit me. I asked the husband to try it on and, of course, it fit him much better. Begrudgingly, he agreed that with a little bit of altering, this blue terry cloth bathrobe could be his summer robe. That was very sweet of him, but I had not yet given up hope of this thing being my bathrobe.

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IMG_0022Because this bathrobe was just big all the way around, I started my alterations by tracing the size XL pattern and placing its pieces on the bathrobe. With my sliver of soap, I traced the XL size on to the fabric. I then stitched on my soap lines. It was not an exact match. I had to fudge where some seams were already sewn together (I was not in the mood to unpick terry cloth), but it worked out fine in the end. After sewing it, I cut off the extra and tried the bathrobe on again. Wow, it so much better fitting already! The armscye was still very low, so I stitched the side seams up higher into the sleeve to solve that issue. I now had a bathrobe that fit quite well. It was still big and oversized, but it was the right amount of oversized this time around. Even more importantly, I knew what size and alterations like raising the armscye to make on the husband’s bathrobe, so I was now ready to cut into the monster flannel without fear of flubbing it up.

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P1020779The flannel was a dream to work with after working with the stretch of the terry cloth. It cut and sewed up great. It was not long before I had something for the husband to try on. Because of all I had learned while fitting my bathrobe, there were only a few tweaks needed to his before the fit was just what he wanted. I am anxious for the husband to wear his new flannel bathrobe and give it a proper tryout. He has always previously had knit bathrobes and I wonder if he will miss the stretch of the knit that the flannel does not have. If he does not mind the loss of the stretch, I think I will make me a flannel bathrobe next time too.

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As I looked at the fun monster design on the husband’s bathrobe, I became jealous that mine was just a boring old baby blue one, so I decided to add some embroidery to my bathrobe to spice it up a little. It was not hard for me to pick a design. I chose a Peanuts design that I had always wanted to try out, but I had just never found the right item to put it on. My bathrobe was the perfect choice to try it out on. One problem that arose was that I did not place the design very well. I placed it where I would have placed it on a shirt. I did not take into account IMG_0018that the robe is so oversized, or the cross over of the fabric when the robe is closed, or the fact that I will wear the bathrobe without a bra on. Anyway, the design is stitched where it is and I can’t change that now, but I did learn another valuable lesson regarding embroidery design placement on bathrobes. Besides that, no one but the husband is ever going to see me in my bathrobe. And he is happy that he does not have to wear the baby blue terry cloth, and I love having a Snoopy and Charlie Brown on my bathrobe.

Goodnight Blues Clues! (Part 1)

IMG_0002Excited to finally have my sewing mojo back, I decided to start with Simplicity 2771, a pattern for flannel pajamas with piping. This project was a little difficult for me to get started because this project is what I have labeled ’empirical sewing’. In this case by empirical I mean that I am not making these pajamas for anyone in particular. I just want to try the pattern and the piping to increase my sewing skill set a bit. So, what size should I make? What fabric should I use? Who will wear these, a boy or a girl? Do I want to make any adjustment to the size of the pattern just from the look of the pattern pieces? Do I add the pocket or not? Who Knows? When I sew with someone in mind, say the little neighbor girl, it is easier since I have her measurements, and I have a feel for what colors or prints she would like. Since I don’t know who will wear these pajamas, I pondered these questions for way too long in my opinion and I finally had to tell myself “Enough! Just do it!” So, I picked the smallest size from the pattern, which was XS or 4-5 Years old. Then I picked a piece of fabric from the stash with Blues Clues on it, and I decided that I would make no adjustments to the pattern as well as no pocket since the print was busy enough as is. And If this project does not work out well, I would be out less fabric by making it in the smallest size and I figured the Blues Clues fabric was dated (Do kids even know who Blues Clues is anymore?). And I know that even after I complete this project, after these pajamas are given to someone, I may be altering it to fit, by shortening or lengthening the hems, etc.. But I guess that is the issue with sewing emperically.

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P1030201Knowing how flannel always shrinks the first time it is washed, I washed and dried the fabric first and then I was ready to cut. As I cut out the pieces of this pattern, I realized that this piece of fabric was not a flannel, but instead just a cotton. It is a little thicker than quilting cotton and has a texture to it, but it is not a true flannel. And since I was just sewing to learn some new skills, I decided to just keep on going even though this project was supposed to be flannel pajamas, and not cotton ones. Also, I figured that I had plenty of fabric to do the project and I would have some fabric left over, but after cutting out the shirt, I almost did not have enough for the pants because of the print. I could have turned Blue upside down on the back of the pants and still had plenty of fabric left over, but for Blue to be upright, I had to cut the pants a little off from the grain line and shorten the pants length by an inch. It is only off the grain line by less than 1/2 an inch and I can make up the lost inch in length with a shorter hem so I kept on cutting.

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P1030197When it was finally time to start sewing, I decided to not follow the sewing guide in the pattern. And since I had mainly wanted to try out adding the piping, I skipped straight to that step first. The pattern assumed you would purchase the piping if you added it, so it does not give you instructions on how to make your own piping. But making piping is pretty straight forward and I made my own anyway. I had some previously purchased cording to use for it and not really knowing what I wanted at the time I had purchased it, so I picked a fairly good sized diameter cording, (and I learned that I would like a smaller diameter cording for the next time I do some piping on clothes.) Because I had originally thought that the Blues Clues fabric was a flannel, I had picked a pink flannel to make the piping with. I know that the covering for the cording should be cut on the bias so that it has some stretch to it, but I’m frugal at heart and I did not want to use all my pink flannel to make the piping for a project that may not even work out, so I just cut some 2 inch strips off of my pink flannel piece. Flannel has a little stretch to it so I thought it should work out ok. I placed the cording inside the 2 inch strips and using my zipper foot, I sewed the cording into the strip of flannel. Then after sewing the shoulder seams, I stitched the newly made piping to the front of the shirt. And it worked out great! Yes, sewing the curves of the piping on was a little interesting, but I don’t know if that was because of my inexperience in sewing with piping or because of the piping not being cut on the bias. I blame it on the first one, but that may not always be the case.

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IMG_0001I was smart enough to follow the pattern guide when it came to ironing and clipping the seams. Ironing the seam in the correct direction made the construction of the pajama top so much easier and gave the piping a better finished look once it was done. The double facing on the front of this top was tricky. Because you want the tops front facing to be seen, it is sewn on backwards of how you would normally add a facing that is folded back. This complexity makes this pattern a poor choice for a beginning sewer. Once you wrap your mind around it being backwards, it becomes clear how the facings need to be sewn on, but at first it is very confusing, and sewing the curves backwards does take some skill.

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You know, I hate long posts, but I have so much more to tell you about this pattern. So, I am going to stop here and type a part two later. So, stay tuned.

The Interfacing Battle Continues

Interfacing… why did it have to be interfacing? I hate interfacing! (a quote from Indiana Jones wife, if she were a seamstress)

Having recently abandoned fusible interfacing for sew in interfacing, I stared at the yards of fusible interfacing in the stash and wondered what to do with it. Should I send in to the thrift store and curse someone else who purchased and used it? Should I attach a note with it when I send it off? A note about all the ways that I have tried to make it work and that have failed, so the next owner will not have to repeat my disasters with it? Possibly the new owner of this interfacing would be wiser than me, and know the secrets of applying fusible interfacing properly, making this a great find for their trip to the thrift store. Or, should I just throw it away for fear of cursing anyone else with this stuff?

While talking to my mom recently, I mentioned my latest interfacing dilemma and she suggested washing and drying the fusible interfacing before use, and thus making it sew in interfacing. I was ok with washing the interfacing before use since I had always preshrank this type of interfacing before I used it each time anyway. But putting it in the dryer after washing it seemed like a recipe for disaster, that I could not quite wrap my head around. My first thought was if I put the fusible interfacing in a hot dryer, it is going to fuse to something. Horrible pictures popped into my mind of interfacing being melted to the drum of the dryer and spending hours, if not days, trying to clean the interfacing out of the dryer. I mentioned my mom’s comments to the husband and he said to go ahead and try it, since he was the one that would be repairing the dryer if anything went wrong. And so now with two people encouraging me to do it, I went ahead and washed the fusible interfacing and then tossed it into the dryer.

Horror of horrors! Now I am currently at the local appliance store looking for a new dryer! Nah, not really!

Luckily, the horrible story I had seen in my mind did not come true thank goodness. The interfacing did not stick to the dryer at all. It did leave little dots of unglued glue all over the interior, but a quick vacuuming of the dryer and the vent took care of that. It did fuse to itself a little bit though. I had to pull it apart in spots to get it flat enough to fold. The white, a longer piece, did not stick to itself as bad as the two shorter pieces of black did. I don’t know if the length really made a difference or if one just had more glue over the other, or if it just did not lose its glue in the process.

Not being able to iron the interfacing at this point, it looks a little bit wrinkled and worn. And boy did it shrink! The pieces are now considerably smaller than they were originally. But, there is still a lot of glue on each piece. Enough glue, that on my latest project I decided to try using it again as a fusible interfacing. I cut it out and ironed it on the pieces of my project and it looks great with no bubbles! Plus, there was still plenty of glue to hold the interfacing on to the fabric while I sewed it together.

So, now what should I do? Do I abandon the yards of sew in interfacing I have just bought and return to the now usable fusible interfacing? So far I have decided to play it project by project to see which one I use with which project. So with this new process, I will see if this answers the fusible interfacing conundrum that I previously had.

Slit Packets – Trial #1

To start, let me tell you what a slit placket is to me because I know not that that is what the sewing community really calls it. When I sew the husband a placket shirt, I make two facings and cut out the center of the shirt and sew the facings in. I call this a cut placket. When I make a placket shirt for a child, the pattern I have calls for one facing and to sew a slit, cut, and then fold the facing to form the placket. Thus, I call this type of placket a slit placket. Now, of the two, I like sewing a cut placket so much more because that is what I have been making for years but the time has come to learn a new skill and master the slit placket.

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As I mentioned in my previous blog post, the construction of the child’s shirt to try out the sew in interfacing was a disaster because of the slit placket. I went into the construction a little cocky because of the the success I had on the slit for the button in the back of the gray Mickey Mouse dress I had previously made. What I quickly learned was that the slit was easy to make but matching the fold is the hard part especially if the slit is not just right. I struggled my way through the slit placket construction. It was not perfect, barely acceptable. I know where I went wrong but I was done playing with it and pushed it to the side. I did not know if I would finish the shirt or just call it a practice run of the sew in interfacing and the placket.

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When I panicked about preshrinking the interfacing, I grabbed the half constructed shirt and threw it in the washer too. I had not preshrunk the interfacing before I sewed it in. Washing it would tell me about shrink in an already made garment.

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This comforted me that maybe the fabric and interfacing was not a total waste. I would learn from it and boy, did I.  The interfacing did just fine in the washer but the placket fell to pieces. It totally came unstitched. Now, the placket was totally unacceptable and I learned that I had done something really wrong, and I definitely had some more learning to do.

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While the interfacing was washing, I did not want to waste precious sewing time, so I decided to cut out the husband’s new shirt while waiting for the wash to complete. After having a blonde moment and cutting the front of the husband’s shirt not on the fold, I decided to cut out another child’s shirt with a slit placket from the fabric of my cutting error. Luckily, I had extra fabric and was able to cut out a new front for the husband’s shirt on the fold. When the first shirt came out of the washer and the placket was a mess, I decided to sew the new child’s shirt I has just cut out first. I will let you know how that turned out in the next blog post.